Good Teachers Are Also Good Students

An article by Richard James Rogers (Author of The Quick Guide to Classroom Management)

Accompanying video:

I have always loved mathematics, but I’ve not always been ‘good’ at maths. I got a grade A for GCSE Mathematics when I was 16 years old (a grade I worked really, really hard for) but I struggled with mathematics at ‘AS’ and ‘A’ – Level (the UK’s pre-university qualifications). 

img_0413
“An AMAZING Book!”

It just so happened that mathematics wasn’t a subject I needed as a prerequisite for my university course anyway. So, in a sense, I committed the cardinal sin of thinking that it ‘didn’t matter’. I was planning to study molecular biology at university, and my admissions tutors were mainly interested in my biology and chemistry grades.

3.1-01

I achieved my goal of going to uni and doing my PGCE in order to become a fully qualified Science teacher in 2006. I was happy for several years, but my failure to complete my mathematics education at school kept gnawing at me like an annoying itch. I needed to do something about it. 

I decided to complete the Certificate in Mathematics course with the Open University in 2009, after three years of being a full-time science teacher. This course covered everything in my ‘A’-Level syllabus with some extra, university-level topics thrown in. It was challenging and offered me just what I needed: closure. As a distance-learning course, it also offered me the chance to study and work as a teacher at the same time. 

2-01

As I started studying the course and handing in assignments (which had to be snail mailed to the UK  – I was living in Thailand at the time), I began to realise how much I had become disconnected from the student experience as a teacher. It had been around three years since I had ever studied anything seriously, and this mathematics course was teaching me how difficult it was to:

  • Meet deadlines
  • Seek help when in doubt
  • Have the self-discipline needed to study at a regular time-slot each day

These skills were, of course, things I had to do whilst completing my degree course and schooling earlier in life, but it had been a few years since I had been immersed in serious study like this. I was slowly losing empathy for my students: that was until this course gave me a wake-up call. 

Another big thing I took from this experience was just how stressful it can be to prepare for a difficult exam (and to complete it). I had to fly to the UK to take the end of course mathematics exam (a three hour beast), and along with the intense revision that came in the few days running up to the exam I had the misfortune of not sleeping so well the night before the big day. And then, once sat down and actually completing the paper, three hours felt like it went by in an instant.

img_0482

I guess I’m trying to make a number of points in this trip down Memory Lane – namely that by immersing ourselves in the ‘student experience’ we can, as teachers:

  • Regain, or enhance, our true understanding of just how many hurdles await our students on their race to the exam finish-line.
  • Learn new skills and concepts that can be applied to our roles as classroom managers, leaders and ‘purveyors’ of specialist knowledge.
  • Build self-discipline, and pass on the lessons learned to our students in our roles as mentors, homeroom teachers, form tutors and coaches.

One final point to stress is that, whilst we can study almost any subject we want via online platforms like EdX and Coursera these days, it’s also important that we take the time to thoroughly reflect on a regular basis. Keeping a journal of things we’ve done well, and things we messed up, can be a great way to have a written record to read over when we want to celebrate successes and remind ourselves of lessons we have learned on our journeys as educators. This video I made a few years ago goes into this in more detail:

IMG_5938

We welcome you to join the Richard James Rogers online community! Join us on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates, giveaways of Richard’s books, special offers, upcoming events and news. 

richard-rogers-online

The IB Results ‘Scandal’ of 2020

An article by Richard James Rogers (Author of The Quick Guide to Classroom Management)

Originally published July 19th 2020. Updated July 23rd and July 26th 2020.

I’m very grateful to everyone who has e-mailed me to ask how they can support my work. If you would like to support my work, then you can purchase one of my great, value-for-money books from Amazon.

Skip to the end of this article to see links to external news sources and blogs on this topic (updated 26th July)

IMPORTANT DOCUMENT: IBSCA Letter to Universities (This is a letter that could be used to support an IB student’s application to university or college. It is from Richard Markham: CEO of the IB Schools and Colleges Association and spells out clearly the nature of the inconsistencies in this year’s IB grades.). This letter was e- mailed to every UK university on 20th July 2020 by IBSCA. 

It’s the story of the decade that’s had students, parents and schools up-in-arms – and it’s at danger of fading away if we don’t keep shedding light on it. 

img_0413

“An amazing book!”

So, what exactly happened?

Paula Wilcock, IB’s Chief Assessment Officer, answered that question in a blog post published immediately after the IB Results were released. After telling students to “focus on your two-year IB journey” and not worry about their grades too much, Paula finally describes how this year’s students were assessed:

In order to award a diploma or course certificate, following the cancellation of all external written components of our examinations for the May 2020 session, we asked students to complete their internal assessment (IA) coursework as usual, which were submitted to us by IB World Schools.

Following the submission of IAs, we used historical assessment data to ensure that we followed a rigorous process of due diligence in what was, and still is, truly an unprecedented situation. We undertook significant data analysis from previous examination sessions, individual schools and subject data.

International Baccalaureate (IB) students who were due to sit terminal examinations in April and May of this year were denied the chance to sit their exams due to the COVID19 pandemic. Instead, schools had to submit each student’s coursework (known as Internal Assessments or ‘IAs’), submit a predicted grade and, crucially, submit historical assessment data.

chatting in class

Just to add a bit of context – the IB Diploma is an important pre-university qualification, and is a non-traditional (and popular) alternative to ‘A’-Levels that is widely respected the world-over.

The IB’s request for historical assessment data has probably been the issue that has caused the most contention in the wake of this story. Upon first glance, outsiders like parents and students may have thought that this meant that assessment data for each student over the course of the two years of their studies was submitted for analysis. However, what the IB actually asked for was the past five years of each school’s predicted grades and actual grades, in order to determine how accurate each school is at making predictions. 

mess around in class

I personally think that this was an illogical step to take. Here’s why:

  • Teachers get better at predicting grades as time goes by
  • Teachers change year after year
  • Schools have to be accredited to run the IB anyway (so, why not trust the schools to do their jobs properly?)
  • Some schools have only been teaching the IB for a few years (less than five)
  • The accuracy of predictions a school made five years ago has no relevance to the accuracy of predictions made today

On top of all this, it doesn’t even seem as though the IB used a fair and consistent algorithm when assigning grades:

  • IAs (coursework) were graded down for many students, after having been assessed by experienced teachers in many cases (teachers who’ve been assessing coursework for years with no issues)
  • Students in the same school seem to have been marked differently – getting the same predicted grades and IA grades, but different overall grades

To boil it all down to one sentence: The IB seem to have assessed this year’s students inconsistently. In fact, the inconsistencies as so massive, that the UK’s exam watchdog, Ofqual, has started an investigation into the IB’s assessment methods for this year’s cohort and has asked for the assessement algorithm to be disclosed.

In a massive show of defiance and anger, over 20,000 IB students have signed a petition calling for ‘justice’. If one wants to get an idea of how deeply this resentment runs, then go to the IB’s Instagram page and look at the comments under the ‘Congratulations Class of 2020’ photo – scores of students telling their personal stories, and describing how they feel that their trust in the IB Organization was misplaced. 

Update (26th July 2020)

The playlist below is well-worth a watch. In a short series of interviews, a selection of IB students from around the world describe how they have been affected (emotionally, financially and mentally) by this year’s grading system (Courtesy of The International Student Podcast YouTube channel). 

Update (23rd July 2020)

There have been a number of interesting developments this week (but more still needs to be done to bring more attention this story):

  • The Norwegian Data Protection Authority (NO DPA) sent an official letter to the IBO requesting information regarding exactly how students were assessed. The authority has requested clarification on 7 key points of confusion (see the images below)
  • The IB Schools and Colleges Association (IBSCA) – a support network of IB Schools – published a letter designed to be used to support any student’s application to university. The letter spells out what has happened this year, and makes it clear that many students (especially at the higher end of the achievement spectrum) have been marked down by the IB’s algorithms. You can download the letter as a pdf here: IBSCA Letter to Universities

Nowegian 1

Norwegian 2

Norwegian 3

Norwegian 4

References and further reading

[IB Blog] – Advice from IB’s Paula Wilcock: Focus on your two-year IB journey [6th July 2020] : https://blogs.ibo.org/blog/2020/07/06/advice-from-ibs-paula-wilcock-focus-on-your-two-year-ib-journey/

[Times Educational Supplement] – Exclusive: IB grading being investigated by watchdog [9th July 2020] : https://www.tes.com/news/exclusive-coronavirus-ib-grading-being-investigated-watchdog

[Telegraph] – Ofqual steps in as thousands of students miss out on expected IB Diploma grades [12th July 2020]: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/07/12/ofqual-steps-thousands-students-miss-expected-ib-diploma-grades/

[Beijing Kids Blog] – Lower Than Predicted IB 2020 Results Spark Outrage [18th July 2020]: https://www.beijing-kids.com/blog/2020/07/18/ib-2020-results-sparks-outrage/

[South China Morning Post] – Hong Kong schools seek review of students’ poorer-than-expected results as International Baccalaureate grading sparks dismay, global petition: https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/education/article/3094692/hong-kong-schools-seek-review-students-poorer-expected [26th July 2020]

IMG_5938

We welcome you to join the Richard James Rogers online community! Join us on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates, giveaways of Richard’s books, special offers, upcoming events and news. 

richard-rogers-online

How a TEFL Gap Year Will Benefit Your Future

You may be doing your TEFL course and teaching abroad as a ‘gap year’ before starting a career which you studied for at university. Many people will ask you ‘Why do you want to teach English abroad? Aside from a so-called year off, how will it benefit you?’. Today, I’ve invited Rose-Anne Turner, Admissions Director at Destination TEFL, to share her thoughts with us.

A year of teaching abroad can benefit you in number of ways:

You’ll gain confidence 

So many parts of this experience will help you to gain confidence – from travelling alone abroad to a new place, to experiencing new cultures, to doing something new, to learning to speak in front of people.

Your communication skills will improve

Techniques learnt on the course and practiced in the classroom thereafter, will improve your general communication skills. You will be far more aware of whether or not you have been understood, and will adjust the way you speak and listen to people in general. You will also become more confident speaking to large groups of people, as well as on a one-to-one basis.

Clay class

Your time management skills will improve

You’ll become the master of checklists! There’s nothing like leaving behind your materials and wasting all your hard work and effort to make you more organised! Carefully planning your lessons according to a time schedule will also be great practice for time management.

img_0413

You’ll become more aware of other cultures

As you’ve moved to another country and are teaching students who are not from your culture, you will become acutely aware of the differences between cultures, and the pitfalls of dealing with people from other cultures. These include misunderstandings, doing things in different ways, and knowing that what is acceptable in one culture, may not be so in another culture. In the corporate workplace one day, this will be a valuable asset to have, particularly in jobs where you’ll be dealing with international clients.

award

Networking

You will make friends for life – after meeting people you would never have met back home. These could be your fellow classmates on the TEFL course, your fellow teachers while teaching, or neighbours and other locals, as well as your students. Having an international network of friends and past colleagues can also advance your career in ways you may never know – as you never know where the future may take you.

You’ll mature and grow as a person

All the challenges and hardships of living abroad will give you a tough skin and mature you in ways that staying at home in a familiar environment won’t do. Moving out of your parental home is testing enough for many young adults – but doing so in a different country really challenges!

Well there you have it. There are many more reasons to sail away from familiar shores, but these reasons are ones that you can proudly mention in interviews and cover letters. So what are you waiting for? 

If you’re thinking of getting a TEFL qualification and teaching overseas, then Destination TEFL can help you!

IMG_5938

We welcome you to join the Richard James Rogers online community! Join us on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates, giveaways of Richard’s books, special offers, upcoming events and news. 

richard-rogers-online

 

International Teaching: Dealing With Culture Shock When Moving to a New Country

Teaching internationally can be very rewarding and enjoyable. You’ll most certainly pick-up new skills, experience a new culture and become part of a new and diverse community. For some, however, the move to a new country can be a big ‘shock to the system’.

Today, I’ve invited Rose-Anne Turner, Admissions Director at Destination TEFL, to share her advice on how to deal with culture shock when moving to a new country.

Culture Shock – a much used term for those who travel. But what does it mean exactly?

Culture shock is what you experience after leaving the familiarities of your home culture to live in another cultural or social environment. Even those who are open-minded and well-travelled are not immune to culture shock. Symptoms include homesickness, anger, loneliness and boredom. Everyone will experience culture shock to some extent, but there are ways to deal with it and minimise the effects.

chatting in class

Firstly, understand what you are going through and why you feel insecure or anxious. You are faced with a different climate, unfamiliar with your surroundings, as well as people with different values, attitudes, lifestyles, and political and religious beliefs, and oftentimes, you can’t even understand them due to language barriers! Understanding why you feel the way you do will help you to overcome the feeling.

Once you understand, the next step is to accept and adapt to your new culture. Just because something is different, doesn’t mean it is wrong, so learn to do things the way the locals do, and accept that it’s the way it’s done in your new home.

Learn as much as possible about your destination before leaving home. Be open-mined and it will be easier to understand the differences and see things from a different perspective. If you know why people do things the way they do them, it’s easy to accept the differences.

img_0413

Having a positive attitude can make all the difference. This goes with anything in life, but is especially true when travelling and interacting with new people in new surroundings.

Block building

Stay in touch with those back home. But… if you spend all your time connecting with family and friends back home, you’ll just keep feeling homesick and won’t feel up to making new friends. Rather spend your time exploring and meeting new people, and then you have something to tell loved ones back home when you do chat.

Don’t compare your home culture to your new culture! Noticing the differences is normal, and can be fun, but see the differences as just that – different and exciting, not inferior to home. Take the opportunity to learn as much as possible about your new location and culture.

Keep yourself busy. Particularly enjoy the things you can’t do at home. Try new foods, swim in the sea, explore, make new friends, take full advantage of the time abroad rather than being afraid and hiding in your hotel room or apartment. Don’t have regrets later by saying ‘if only I had done this or seen that…’

Laugh at yourself! If you get lost, just think of it as a way to discover a new place that you didn’t expect to see. Surrounding yourself with positive people can make all the difference. Don’t get sucked into the inevitable groups of ‘grumpy old expats’ who should have gone back home long ago, and now love trashing their new home.

There are different phases of culture shock, and knowing which you are going through will also help you to overcome it.

The Honeymoon Phase: This is a fun time, when all is great, exciting, and new. You embrace the differences, go out of your way to try the weird and wonderful food and relish meeting exotic new people. This phase can last days, weeks, or months.

Continent Investigation

The Honeymoon is Over Phase: During this phase, you start observing differences, however slight, and not always in a good way. You’ve had enough of the food, and miss home comforts and tastes. The local attitudes annoy you, and things are just so much better at home. During this phase, you may feel sad, irritable, angry or anxious. You miss holidays from home such as Christmas or Thanksgiving, and feel sad when you miss out on events such as birthday celebrations back home.
 
The Negotiation Phase: Now you decide if you will give in to negativity or power-on past it to make the most of your experience. If you’re successful, you regain your sense of perspective, balance, and humour, and move on to the next phase.
 
The All’s Well, or Everything is Okay Phase: You start feeling more at home with the differences in the new culture. After a while, you may feel as if the culture isn’t in fact new, but that you belong here now, or you may not exactly feel part of the culture, but you’re comfortable enough with it to enjoy the differences and challenges. You don’t necessarily have to be in love with the new country (as in the honeymoon phase), but you can navigate it without unwarranted anxiety, negativity, and criticism.

The Reverse Culture Shock Phase: This happens to most who have lived abroad a while. Once you’ve become accustomed to the way things are done in a different country, you can go through the same series of culture shock phases when you return home.
 
Culture shock can present itself at any time, and it’s often the small things we feel the most – like navigating a grocery store with unfamiliar products in currencies we are not familiar with. Working abroad has its own challenges, as aside from day-to-day cultural differences, there are also the differences in the work place. For example, if you are typically organised and punctual, you may struggle to adapt working to a culture with a more relaxed working environment. Or, if you’re a woman, you may find it difficult to adapt in a country where there is gender inequality.
 
It’s most important to be patient – in time, things that once were strange will be the norm. Be kind to yourself, and don’t place high expectations on yourself until you have adjusted to your new life. While moving to a new country is daunting in many ways, it can be equally rewarding, and by not giving it a try, you’ll always have regrets.

IMG_5938

We welcome you to join the Richard James Rogers online community! Join us on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates, giveaways of Richard’s books, special offers, upcoming events and news. 

richard-rogers-online